Freedom Scientific partners with Computers for the Blind to give the best computing experience to those who need it

Introduction

Nothing pleases us more than to learn how our technology has assisted our customers to realize their potential on the job, at school or in the community. We also regularly give back to the community by partnering with organizations serving the blind community who make a difference. So, when we had the opportunity to partner with an organization that makes a difference by putting empowering technology in the hands of people who may otherwise not be able to obtain it, we thought it was the perfect fit.

That’s why we’re pleased to tell you about our partnership with Computers for the Blind.

Common beginnings

Our organizations have similar beginnings. The company responsible for the creation and early development of JAWS, Henter-Joyce, was founded in part by a blind man, Ted Henter, who was blinded in a car accident. He decided that a future of possibilities lay in computing, and ultimately started his own company and screen reader to help make the world a more accessible place.

CFTB was founded by Bob Langford. Like Ted, he was also blinded in an accident, but at an earlier age. He was just sixteen. Bob earned a Doctorate’s Degree in Vocational Rehabilitation.

Eventually, he received his first computer and discovered how computers could overcome many obstacles. He wanted to share this gift with others and started what would become Computers for the Blind.

What CFTB does

CFTB is a Non-Profit, volunteer organization devoted to providing computers to blind or visually impaired people. Inspired by the mission of their founder, they hope each person who is blind or visually impaired may experience the information age in a positive and productive manner. They believe, as I’m certain do those reading this blog, that technology opens new worlds and creates opportunity for greater personal freedom.

They refurbish donated computers and provide them pre-installed with Fusion for their clients. This means that when a CFTB computer arrives, it’s all ready to plug in, switch on, and get started right away with the best screen reading and magnification options available, JAWS and ZoomText.

Any blind or visually impaired person in the United States can apply to CFTB for a computer, using the application form on their website. The process is clearly explained, and fact sheets are available.

David Jeppson, the Executive Director of Computers for the Blind says, “CFTB is very appreciative of Freedom Scientific for their generosity in donating such exceptional software to our consumers.”

Specifics of our partnership

As stated above, all computers now shipping from CFTB have Fusion preinstalled. This means you can run JAWS and ZoomText individually or together depending on your requirements. The computers run Windows 10, so they can keep up-to-date with all the accessibility updates rolling out regularly.

We’ve enrolled CFTB as a partner in our Home Use program, meaning it will be easy for CFTB clients to keep the software current. Here’s how it works.

When you turn on your PC from CFTB, you have a one-year fully functional license for Fusion, meaning you can run JAWS, ZoomText, or both at no cost for a year. After the first year, recipients will automatically be enrolled in our Home Use program and be able to purchase updates.

If you choose not to purchase updates after the first year, you can still run the products in 40-minute mode.

Once you’re enrolled in the Home Use program, you are a full customer of the product you purchased, able to install your copy on multiple computers.

More information

If you know of someone who doesn’t yet have a computer and could benefit from one, you can find more information on the Computers for the Blind website.

 

1 Comment

  1. David Goldfield

    In late 2013 I knew that we would soon have to retire our Windows XP machine. As there was no way that particular PC could have been upgraded to run Windows 7 buying a new computer was our only option but money was very tight for us. I had known about Computers for the Blind for many years and I decided that it was time to go beyond just knowing about their services to being a CFTB customer. Buying a refurbished computer from a third party can understandably make some people a bit nervous but I decided to give them a try. They definitely exceeded my expectations. They distribute a variety of computers so what I received will likely not be the same type of PC users might receive today. However, the computer which they sent me was a Dell Optiplex running, at that time, Windows 7. Its specs were reasonable and the machine was responsive and booted up quickly and almost seemed like a new machine. I highly recommend this organization and I am pleased that more users will have an opportunity to use JAWS, Zoomtext or Fusion.

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